Nima Arkani-Hamed

Nima Arkani-­Hamed, Professor in the School of Natural Sciences since 2008 and one of the world’s leading phenomenologists, has taken a lead in building models of the universe that relate to theories that can be tested at particle accelerators like the Large Hadron Collider—from supersymmetry to large extra dimensions of space to the idea that our universe exists in a sea of universes, each governed by a different set of principles.

PiTP 2017, titled "Particle Physics at the LHC and Beyond," took place from July 17 to July 28, 2017, and covered topics ranging from experimental results in particle physics to prospects for physics beyond the standard model. ...

In 2016, Professor Nathan Seiberg celebrates his sixtieth birthday and reaches his twentieth year as a Professor at the Institute for Advanced Study. The conference celebrating these occasions was...

Three years ago, just before it was scheduled to shut down in preparation for its second phase, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) discovered the Higgs boson. Its discovery was expected, having been predicted nearly sixty years earlier by Peter...

What do the motion of the planets in our solar system, the energy levels of the hydrogen atom, and the interactions between subatomic particles have in common? Surprisingly, they are all governed by the same hidden symmetry principles. This is...

The Institute’s thirteenth annual Prospects in Theoretical Physics (PiTP) summer program for graduate students and postdoctoral scholars, which focused on string theory, was truly extraordinary in that it overlapped with Strings 2014. This is one...

On November 12, at the opening of the Large Hadron Collider exhibition at the Science Museum in London, Nima Arkani-Hamed...

There are glimpses of truths that don’t immediately make sense, that are puzzles, that we see only vaguely from a distance, or that we can see just one facet of, and they may remain puzzles for our lifetimes and several more after; we may only catch a dim impression, a shadow of what they imply.

Following the discovery in July of a Higgs-like boson—an effort that took more than fifty years of experimental work and more than 10,000 scientists and engineers working on the Large Hadron Collider—Juan Maldacena and Nima Arkani-Hamed, two...

It is indeed an endless cycle of imagination and concentration, of divergence and convergence, of playing and thinking that deter­mines the rhythm of science and scholarship. The Institute is devoted to creating and sup­porting these experiences and the resulting, often surprising, advancements in knowledge.

 

Before dawn on July 4, CERN scientists announced the discovery of a new particle consistent with the boson predicted nearly fifty years ago by Peter Higgs. He gave one of his first seminars on his theory at the Institute at the invitation of...

In this talk, Nima Arkani-Hamed, Professor in the School of Natural Sciences, discusses the direction of fundamental physics in coming years and decades, including efforts to replace the concept of spacetime...

Physicists have used Feynman diagrams as a tool for calculating scattering amplitudes that describe particle interactions for more than six decades. Their broad utility was due initially in large part to the seminal work of Freeman Dyson,...