Avi Wigderson

Avi Wigderson, Herbert H. Maass Professor in the School of Mathematics, is a widely recognized authority in the diverse and evolving field of theoretical computer science. His main research area is computational complexity theory, which studies the power and limits of efficient computation and is motivated by fundamental scientific problems. Since being appointed to the Faculty in 1999, Wigderson has overseen the Institute’s activities in theoretical computer science.

In 2016, Avi Wigderson, Herbert H. Maass Professor in the School of Mathematics, celebrates his sixtieth birthday. The Institute for Advanced Study hosted a conference in honor of this occasion from October 5 through October 8, 2016, with...

This Institute event celebrates the work and impact of Jean Bourgain, IBM Von Neumann Professor in the School of Mathematics and member of the Faculty since 1994. Recipient of the Fields Medal and the Shaw Prize,...

Many natural and social phenomena may be viewed as inherently computational; they evolve patterns of information that can be described algorithmically and studied through computational models and techniques. A workshop on the computational lens,...

What do quantum interference, flocking of birds, Facebook communities, and stock prices have in common? 

Many natural and social phenomena may be viewed as inherently computational; they evolve patterns of information that can be described...

I sometimes like to think about what it might be like inside a black hole. What does that even mean? Is it really “like” anything inside a black hole? Nature keeps us from ever knowing. (Well, what we know for sure is that nature keeps us from...

Computational Intractability and Pseudorandomness

The areas of computational intractability and pseudorandomness  have been among the most exciting scientific disciplines in the past decades, with...

During the first term of 2007–08, School of Mathematics Professor Jean Bourgain and Member Van Vu of Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, ran a program on arithmetic combinatorics. The Members in residence for the program ranged from...

Kurt Gödel’s achievement in modern logic is singular and monumental—indeed it is more than a monument, it is a landmark which will remain visible far in space and time.
—John von Neumann

Upon presenting Kurt Gödel (1906-1978...