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Near Eastern Studies

Sabine Schmidtke, Professor in the School of Historical Studies, has edited Studying the Near and Middle East at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, 1935–2018 (Gorgias Press, 2018), which traces...

Sabine Schmidtke, Professor in the School of Historical Studies, and Hassan Ansari, Member in the School, have coauthored Studies in Medieval Islamic Intellectual...

As recent events have demonstrated, one of the most significant phenomena of the Arab World’s modern history is the persistence and resilience of undemocratic government. Syria has enjoyed the dubious distinction of leadership in this respect,...

An arcane topic to most people, Syriac sources help shed a more complex light on the history of the Middle East from late antiquity to the Middle Ages. They reveal a non-imperial epoch and its rich contributions to the cultural and religious...

Monotheism constitutes one of the central doctrines of Islam. The notion is again and again voiced in the Qurʾān, thus for example in sūra 112 (entitled “Sincere Religion”) which, in the translation of Arthur Arberry, reads “Say...

To outsiders, the contentiousness, divisiveness, and downright un-neighborliness evident in the small Spanish town of Deza by the autumn of 1607 might well have seemed a tempest in a teapot. Those living in the newer Upper Neighborhood had been...

In this Friends Talk held at the Institute on October 13, 2017, Sabine Schmidtke, Professor in the School of Historical Studies, explores the world heritage of Islamic literature and the efforts to salvage the manuscripts of the Zaydi community...

This interview with Sabine Schmidtke, Professor in the School of Historical Studies, was conducted by Haytham Samir and Ahmad Shaker and originally published in Arabic as “al-Dirāsāt al-islāmiyya fī...

Reducing the intellectually rich and diverse Islamic literary heritage to a bare minimum of what is seen as allegedly authentic is a strategy that is characteristic of Wahhabism, Salafism, and jihadism and their respective proponents. Whatever...

As Alastair Hamilton stated in 2008 in The Forbidden Fruit: The Koran in Early Modern Europe, “few books were as feared and coveted, as abhorred and desired, as the Qurʾān in early modern Europe.” Religious polemics, trading activities,...

In this video, Columba Stewart, George William Cottrell, Jr. Member in the School of Historical Studies, explains how a Benedictine monastery in Minnesota became involved in a massive effort to document the...

Glen Bowersock, Professor Emeritus in the School of Historical Studies, has authored The Crucible of Islam (Harvard...