Astrophysics Events

Oct
26
2020

Princeton University Galread [Galactic/Extragalactic Reading Group]

Dynamical Equilibrium in the Molecular ISM in 28 Nearby Star-forming Galaxies
Discussion Leader: Jiayi Sun
11:00am|Remote via Zoom

Each week, we hold a relatively informal seminar/discussion series with an emphasis on extra-galactic and large-scale structure astrophysics.

During Galread a leader/visitor presents a recent paper to the discussion group. The PDF of the paper is...

Oct
26
2020

Princeton University Exoplanet Discussion Group

Chaotic Dynamical Tides and Efficient Hot Jupiter Formation
Michelle Vick
12:15pm|Virtual Meeting

High-eccentricity (high-e) migration may be an important channel for the formation of hot Jupiters (HJs). In this scenario, a giant planet is excited onto a very eccentric orbit that decays and circularizes on Gyr timescales due to tidal effects in...

Oct
26
2020

Princeton University Gravity Initiative Lunch

Naked Singularities for the Einstein Vacuum Equations: The Exterior Solution
Yakov Shlapentokh-Rothman
12:30pm|via ZOOM

Abstract: We will start by recalling the weak cosmic censorship conjecture.  Then we will review Christodoulou's construction of naked singularities for the spherically symmetric Einstein-scalar field system. Finally, we will discuss joint work with...

Oct
27
2020

Institute for Advanced Study / Princeton University Joint Astrophysics Colloquium

Using Debris Disks to Trace the Dynamics of Planetary Systems
Meredith Hughes

Debris disks are signposts of mature planetary systems, and resolved images of dust grains act like test particles that trace the dynamics of embedded planets. I will describe ongoing efforts with the Atacama Large Millimeter/Submillimeter Array...

Oct
29
2020

Institute for Advanced Study Astrophysics Seminar

Dynamics of Local Group Satellite Galaxies in the Era of Precision Astrometry
Ekta Patel
11:00am|Virtual Meeting

High-precision astrometric data from space observatories, such as the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) and Gaia, are revolutionizing our ability to study the Local Group. 6D phase space measurements (3-dimensional position and velocity) now make it...

Oct
29
2020

Princeton University Department of Physics Donald R. Hamilton Colloquium Series

Explosive Neutron Stars
Andrei Beloborodov
12:00pm|Zoom Webinar

Neutron stars are by far the strongest known magnets in the universe. Some of them (called magnetars) generate explosions by suddenly dissipating magnetic energy with a rate up to 10471047 erg/s. These magnetic explosions emit giant gamma-ray flares...