They-Tell-Stories

Lunaape-IAS Events

UPCOMING EVENTS

27-29 October 2022: Munsee Language & History Symposium
LUNAAPAHKIING, HULUNIIXSUWAAKAN, LUNAAPEEWAK
(Munsee Land, Munsee Language, Munsee People)

This second annual event takes place during the Punihle Waniipakw Niipaahum (Falling Leaf Moon) on Lunaapahkiing, at Princeton University and the Institute for Advanced Study. The gathering puts Princeton and IAS students, staff, members, and faculty in direct dialogue with members of the Munsee-Delaware Nation to learn about Munsee language, history, and culture. Speakers include Munsee language keepers, historians, artists, and community members.

Indigenous language revitalization counteracts the violent history of settler colonial regimes, including boarding schools where Native children were forced to speak English exclusively. This is the second in what we hope will be a series of annual gatherings in support of Lunaape language revitalization efforts.

View the symposium program here. Pre-registration is required for virtual and in-person attendance. Register here.

For questions about the event, please contact Melissa Moreton at: mmoreton [at] ias.edu.
 

PAST EVENTS

13-15 May 2022, 10am-4pm ET: Munsee Delaware Gathering 
MAAWEHLEEWAK - EHAHKIIHEET NIIPAAHUM (Planting Moon)
Munsee Language, History, and Culture weekend (hybrid event)

This Munsee Language, History, and Culture gathering features presentations at the Munsee-Delaware Community Centre. The event will also be hosted virtually and includes presentations on “planting” vocabulary in the Munsee language, starting your own beans and corn, Lunaape objects in museum collections, Munsee Delaware history, and updates on current research projects.  To join the virtual event, contact organizer Ian McCallum at: imccallum72 [at] hotmail.com.


February 1, 2022: Munsee Delaware Story Evening 
NEEKAAWA KIHTAACHIIMUWAK WULAAKWUNUWII (This Evening They Tell Stories)

maawehleewak naxpii Karen Mosko waak Ian McCallum wunjiiyayuwak Nalahii neekaawa laachumohkawaatwak wunj Nalahii Lunaape waak shihsuwanakuw. Karen waak Ian laachumohkawaatwak ambee aanihkwaachiimuwak alohke. Katherine Chupik-Hall akunootamun kteekhiikeew laachumohkawaatwak.

Join Munsee Delaware Nation community members Karen Mosko and Ian McCallum as they share stories from the community in both the Munsee and English languages. Karen and Ian will discuss the background to the stories as well as the active and ongoing interpretation and translation process. Artist Katherine Chupik-Hall will share the artistic approach to illustrating the stories.

Munsee Story Evening: Story 1 - “Weemachekaniishak” (Video 1 of 3) [40 minutes]
https://youtu.be/AMzpIMDIqZU

Munsee Story Evening: Poem - “The Missing Airman” (Video 2 of 3) [34 minutes]
https://youtu.be/4ukKYvSqbHs

Munsee Story Evening: Story 2 - “Njekp kihtaachiimuw” (“Jacob Tells a Story”) by Jacob Logan (Video 3 of 3) [34 minutes]
https://youtu.be/16-EHQsRquI


November 4-5, 2021: Munsee Language Symposium 
LUNAAPAHKIING, HULUNIIXSUWAAKAN, LUNAAPEEWAK (Munsee Land, Munsee Language, Munsee People)

This inaugural event takes place during the Shayeewi Koon Niipaahum (First Snow Moon) on Lunaapahkiing, at Princeton University and the Institute for Advanced Study. The gathering puts Princeton faculty and students in direct dialogue with members of the Munsee-Delaware Nation to learn about Munsee language, history, and culture. Speakers include Munsee language keepers, historians, and speakers from Ontario, New Jersey, New York, and Wisconsin, representing the current lands occupied by Lunaapeewak.

Indigenous language revitalization counteracts the violent history of settler colonial regimes, including boarding schools where Native children were forced to speak English exclusively. We aim to make this an annual event in ongoing support of Lunaape language revitalization efforts. 

The event includes a Language and Culture Circle with Karen Mosko (Munsee Delaware Nation, Ontario), Clan Mother Molly Miller (Stockbridge-Munsee Band of Mohican Indians, Wisconsin), Ian McCallum (Munsee Delaware Nation, Ontario), and Kala Ligon (Sandhill and Navesink descendent, New Jersey); and a Wampum and History Circle with historian Chief Mark Peters (Munsee Delaware Nation, Ontario), Chief Harry Wallace (Unkechaug Nation, New York), Tecumseh Ceaser (Matinecock, Montaukett, and Unkechaug Nation, New York), and Ian McCallum (Munsee Delaware Nation, Ontario).

Sessions are facilitated by Robbie Richardson (Pabineau First Nation, Princeton University), Suzanne Conklin Akbari (IAS), and Sarah Rivett (Princeton University).

This event is a Collaborative Humanities Project of the Humanities Council, presented by the Native American and Indigenous Studies Initiative at Princeton (NAISIP). Co-sponsored by the Fund for Canadian Studies; the Program in American Studies; the Center for Culture, Society & Religion (CCSR); and the School of Historical Studies, Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, NJ.


February 16, 2021: Talking Circle "Undoing the Privilege of Writing"

Virtual talking circles will focus on undoing the privilege of written history, and on undoing the privilege of other forms of written knowledge, from literature to astronomy. In the  process we hope to identify what that privilege is, how it came about, how it is maintained and reproduced, what interests it serves – and most importantly, how to undo it -- in the academic study of history, literature, and other forms of knowledge within the university setting. How can we value the memory practices of oratory, as much as writing often is? This topic opens us up to many forms of exchange, both within oral cultures and between oral and written cultures. It invites us to ask questions about the kind of ideas that writing facilitates, and those that it doesn't. How can we bring the oral, and perhaps even oratory itself, into the hostile environment of the university? What makes a rememberer or memory keeper, and how do these criteria differ among various Indigenous peoples? What kind of training do they undergo in order to learn how to remember and retell storylines? How can we bring rememberers into the classroom, for the study of science, history, story, and medicines?

These talking circles are dedicated to the memory of Pamela George and are organized by Lee Maracle, together with Neil ten Kortenaar, Uzoma Esonwanne, and Suzanne Conklin Akbari, Katherine Blouin and Robbie Richardson.

Facilitators: Lee Maracle, Lochin Brouillard
Presenters: Lee Maracle, Uzoma Esonwanne, Craig Williams, Robbie Richardson, Ange Loft, Mark Peters, Hilding Neilson
Respondents: Tania Carter, Columpa Bobb, Brenda Wastasecoot, Neil ten Kortenaar, Ian McCallum, Smaro Kamboureli, Keren Rice, Linc Kesler, Katherine Blouin
Witnesses: Heba Abd El Gawad, Suzanne Akbari, Ben Akrigg, Flavia Vasconcellos Amaral, Tarren Andrews, Prasad Bidaye, Jill Carter, Alexandra Chang, Wallace Cleaves, Lisa Conathan, Girish Daswani, Brenna Duperron, Amanda Goodman, Alexandra Gillespie, Robin Gray, Christine Johnston, Bryan Keene, Rebecca Futo Kennedy, Lisa King, Tiphaine Lahuec, Jessica Lambert, Isabel M. Lockhart, Michaeline Conklin Mann, Elizabeth Martin, Aven McMaster, Rick Monture, Ashley Caranto Morford, Jackie Murray, Sarah Rivett, Keely Toledo, Maria Mercedes Tuya, Karina Vernon, David Wallace-Hare, Zachary Yuzwa