Seminars

The Theoretical Computer Science and Discrete Mathematics Seminars will take place every Monday at 11:15 a.m. - 12:15 p.m. and every Tuesday at 10:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m. at the Institute for Advanced Study. The lectures will be held in S-101, the seminar room in Simonyi Hall, unless stated otherwise.

If you are interested in attending future seminars and are not already on our mailing list from previous years, please send an e-mail to Andrea Lass and ask to be added.

alass email

 

Upcoming Seminar Titles Include:

Nov
01
2021

Computer Science/Discrete Mathematics Seminar I

Parallel Repetition for the GHZ Game: A Simpler Proof
Uma Girish
11:15am|Simonyi Hall 101 and Remote Access

We give a new proof of the fact that the parallel repetition of the (3-player) GHZ game reduces the value of the game to zero polynomially quickly.  That is, we show that the value of the n-fold parallel repetition of the GHZ game is at most n^{-...

Nov
02
2021

Computer Science/Discrete Mathematics Seminar II

Introduction to Continuous Combinatorics I: the semidefinite method of flag algebras
10:30am|Simonyi Hall 101 and Remote Access

The field of continuous combinatorics studies large (dense) combinatorial structures by encoding them in a "continuous" limit object, which is amenable to tools from analysis, topology, measure theory, etc. The syntactic/algebraic approach of "flag...

Nov
08
2021

Computer Science/Discrete Mathematics Seminar I

The Kakeya Set conjecture over Z mod N for general N
Manik Dhar
11:15am|Simonyi Hall 101 and Remote Access

A Kakeya Set in (Z/N Z)^n is a set that contains a line in every direction.  It has been known for over a decade that such sets must be large when N is prime (or more generally over any finite field).  This goes back to Dvir's proof of the finite...

Nov
09
2021

Computer Science/Discrete Mathematics Seminar II

Introduction to Continuous Combinatorics II: semantic limits
10:30am|Simonyi Hall 101 and Remote Access

The field of continuous combinatorics studies large (dense) combinatorial structures by encoding them in a "continuous" limit object, which is amenable to tools from analysis, topology, measure theory, etc. While the syntactic/algebraic approach of...