Space

“The Noah’s Ark Egg is a way of making space colonies highly cost-effective. They’re very cheap, and also very powerful. They’re using miniaturization to spread life in the universe, not just for exploring," said Freeman Dyson , Professor Emeritus in the School of Natural...
Institute Trustee Sir Martin Rees, former Member in the School of Natural Sciences, sat down with Scientific American 's John Horgan to discuss threats to Earth and humanity, challenges facing the scientific community, Martian communities and utopian societies, and more, saying: The world’s growing...
Albert Einstein said that the “most incomprehensible thing about the universe is that it is comprehensible.” He was right to be astonished. Human brains evolved to be adaptable, but our underlying neural architecture has barely changed since our ancestors roamed the savannah and coped...
Freeman Dyson , Professor Emeritus in the School of Natural Science, looks at recent books on space travel and visions of life beyond Earth in a review for the New York Review of Books: Almost all the current discussion of life in the...
Artist's impression of the Gaia spacecraft, with the Milky Way in the background. Credit: ESA/ATG medialab; background image: ESO, S. BRUNIER
The Gaia spacecraft, which was launched in late 2013 by the European Space Agency, is on a mission to chart the heavens in unprecedented detail. By the end of its five-year-long run it will pinpoint the positions of one billion stars in the sky with...
A recently discovered ultra-faint dwarf galaxy is sending astronomers clues about the makeup of dark matter in the neighborhood of the Milky Way. It is one more clue that a type of stellar object called massive compact halo objects (MACHOs) are probably not the dominant...
Researchers, including Roman Rafikov , Member in the School of Natural Sciences, discuss how "hot Jupiters," "superpuffs," and exoplanets are making us rethink how planetary systems come together. Read more from Science http://ow.ly/hPYg302Rfxg .
Over 20 years ago, Frank Wilczek asked Richard Feynman one of the most disturbing questions in physics: Why doesn't empty space weigh anything?
The Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) has spotted its second set of spacetime ripples, in this case coming from colliding black holes 14 and eight times the mass of the sun.
Scientists who in February announced their landmark discovery of these ripples in spacetime revealed today that they had detected more—again caused by a pair of crashing black holes. This second find shows that the initial discovery was not a rare windfall, but rather a preview...