Simons Center for Systems Biology

Arnold J. Levine, Professor Emeritus in the School of Natural Sciences, was among the first researchers to independently isolate the p53 protein in 1979. A recognized leader in cancer research and mentor to countless young scholars, Levine’s distinguished career has spanned various branches of the...
Michail “Misha” Tsodyks, a world-leading theoretical neuroscientist, will join the Faculty of the School of Natural Sciences as C.V. Starr Professor in the Simons Center for Systems Biology at the Institute for Advanced Study, effective July 1, 2019. Currently a Professor in the Department of...
Cancers most commonly arise because of a series of two to five mutations in different genes that combine to cause a tumor. Evidence from a growing number of experiments focused on truncal mutations—the first mutations in a given sequence—suggests a new direction in understanding the...
Prolific scientist John J. Hopfield , whose work has spanned various fundamental disciplines from physics to molecular biology to neuroscience, has been selected as the recipient of the 2019 Benjamin Franklin Medal in Physics. This prestigious award recognizes excellence in science and technology and...
Myles W. Jackson , newly appointed Professor in the School of Historical Studies will give his first IAS public lecture, "Genes, Patents, and Race: The History of Science as a Bridge Between Disciplines" on Friday, October 26 at 5:30 p.m. in Wolfensohn...
Benjamin Greenbaum , Visitor in the Institute's Simons Center for Systems Biology , is among the seven winners of the 2018 Pershing Square Sohn Prize for Young Investigators in Cancer Research, awarded annually to promising early career, New York City-area cancer research scientists...
Institute for Advanced Study scholars and collaborators have created the first mathematical model to predict how a cancer patient will respond to immunotherapy , according to a study published in Nature .