Nima Arkani-Hamed

“Paleontologists infer the existence of dinosaurs to give a rational accounting of strange patterns of bones,” said Nima Arkani-Hamed , a physicist and cosmologist at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, New Jersey. “We look at patterns in space today, and we infer...
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In the Media

April 22, 2019
Listen to the BBC Radio 3 broadcast by Director's Visitor (2018) Sally Marlow , who interviews IAS Director Robbert Dijkgraaf , and Professors Joan Wallach Scott , Freeman J. Dyson , Nima Arkani-Hamed , and Myles W. Jackson .
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On Wednesday, April 24, Nima Arkani-Hamed , Professor in the School of Natural Sciences, gave a special public lecture at Cornell University. Arkani-Hamed's lecture, "What’s the Point of Doing Fundamental Science?," asked why we should dedicate financial and intellectual resources to questions of seemingly...
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"The world has all kinds of long-term problems, some of which might seem impossible to solve. So it’s important to have a group of people who, over centuries, give a concrete template for how to go about grappling with and ultimately conquering seemingly impossible problems,...
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Writing for Nautilus, George Musser , Director's Visitor and Scientific American contributing editor, highlights current work by Andrew Strominger , Member (1982–1987) in the School of Natural Sciences. Strominger and colleagues are investigating how two nearly identical formulas that concern how gravity...
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Writing for the New Yorker, Director's Visitor (2017) Natalie Wolchover discusses the puzzles and paradoxes of contemporary science that point to "the need to reformulate the theories of modern physics in a new mathematical language," highlighting the work of Professor in the...
Nima Arkani-Hamed , Professor in the School of Natural Sciences, delivered the public lecture “The End of Spacetime” at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory in Menlo Park, CA, on June 19. Watch Arkani-Hamed discuss the union of quantum mechanics and gravity, prospects for spacetime, and...
Everything that humans have seen up until now exists in the 4.9 per cent of the universe that interacts with light. The rest is hidden from view. Most of it, physicists believe—68.3 per cent—is dark energy, an enigmatic force that drives...
John ZuHone of the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observator, gives a lecture at the 2016 Prospects in Theoretical Physics Program. Photo by Andrea Kane.
The 2017 Prospects in Theoretical Physics program will celebrate its sixteenth year by convening more than 130 graduate students and postdoctoral scholars from around the world at the Institute for Advanced Study from July 17 to 28 to explore “Particle Physics at the LHC and...
“What is space and time really? Why is the universe really big?” Professor Nima Arkani-Hamed asks. “And on top of that, we don’t understand why there are big things in it.” Part of a family that zigzagged the globe in pursuit, and defense,...
National Academy of Sciences
Professor Nima Arkani-Hamed is among those newly elected.
How does science work? . . . The scientific method—famously objective, logical and eminently reliable; and the fruits of its success, both pure and applied, are the single most obvious factor in distinguishing the varying levels of progress between different human societies throughout history. But...