Juan Maldacena

“It’s not easy being a 'theory of everything.' A TOE has the very tough job of fitting gravity into the quantum laws of nature in such a way that, on large scales, gravity looks like curves in the fabric of space-time, as Albert Einstein described...
Recent findings on traversable wormholes by physicists including former Members Daniel Jafferis and Aron Wall inspired by the ER = EPR conjecture posed by Juan Maldacena , Carl P. Feinberg Professor in the School of Natural Sciences, and Leonard...
Grand ideas have a way of turning up in unusual settings, far from an office or a chalkboard. Months ago, Quanta Magazine set out to photograph some of the world’s most accomplished scientists and mathematicians, including Juan Maldacena , Carl P. Feinberg...
Mind of the Universe
Robbert Dijkgraaf, Director and Leon Levy Professor, narrates The Mind of the Universe , a ten-part television series that explores the work of thirty scientists. The program features Institute scholars including Juan Maldacena , Carl P. Feinberg Professor in the...
In the 1960s, the charismatic physicist Geoffrey Chew , Member (1956) in the School of Mathematics/Natural Sciences, espoused a radical vision of the universe, and with it, a new way of doing physics, arguing that "Nature is as it is because this is the...
Hundreds of researchers—including School of Natural Sciences Members Eva Silverstein (1999), Vijay Balasubramanian (2007–08), Brian Greene (1992–93), and Hirosi Ooguri (2015, 1988–89), and School of Mathematics Member Dorit Aharonov (1998–99)—are engaged in a collaborative project, "It from...
Theoretical physics is full of mind-boggling ideas, but two of the weirdest are quantum entanglement and wormholes. Juan Maldacena , Carl P. Feinberg Professor in the School of Natural Sciences, describes how the weird quantum phenomenon of entanglement could produce shortcuts between distant black...
String theory has so far failed to live up to its promise as a way to unite gravity and quantum mechanics, but at the same time, it has blossomed into one of the most useful sets of tools in science.
The story of how and why the universe began is written in the sky. Cosmologists believe that details of the Big Bang are encoded in triangles and other shapes that appear in the distribution of galaxies. Lately, they’ve made significant progress in determining what shapes...