Faculty

In math as in life, Vladimir Voevodsky played by his own rules. Voevodsky, a Russian-born mathematical prodigy, produced a string of daring insights in the 1990s that revolutionized one of the central fields of mathematics and established him at the pinnacle of his...
Not going to class isn't typically something good to boast about. But perhaps the late Vladimir Voevodsky is the exception to the rule. Voevodsky is credited with founding new fields of mathematics, such as motivic homotopy theory, and a computer tool to help...
Vladimir Voevodsky , a mathematician who grew up in Russia before coming to the United States, where his work was recognized with the Fields Medal, often regarded as the equivalent of the Nobel Prize for mathematics, died Sept. 30 in Princeton, N.J. He was...
Vladimir Voevodsky, a once-gifted but restless student who flunked out of college out of boredom before emerging as one of the most brilliant and revolutionary mathematicians of his generation, died on Sept. 30 at his home in Princeton, N.J. He was 51. To learn more,...

In the Media

October 04, 2017
Jonathan Benthall of the Times Literary Supplement reviews Punir: Une Passion Contemporaine (Seuil, 2017), by Didier Fassin , James D. Wolfensohn Professor in the School of Social Science. The work, he writes, "testifies admirably to the power of anthropology to pluck theories...
Albert Einstein, one of the Institute's first Faculty members, argued that what we understand as gravity is, in fact, from the curvature of space and time — a hotly debated notion among physicists at the time. Then came the solar eclipse of 1919 — more...
Machine learning — sometimes called the leading edge of artificial intelligence — is the rapidly developing computer technology behind self-driving cars, complex web searches, medical and science applications, and face and speech recognition. Machine-learning programs synthesize knowledge in a way that’s analogous to how children...
Grand ideas have a way of turning up in unusual settings, far from an office or a chalkboard. Months ago, Quanta Magazine set out to photograph some of the world’s most accomplished scientists and mathematicians, including Juan Maldacena , Carl P. Feinberg...
Angelos Chaniotis , Professor in the School of Historical Studies, joins Alexander Nehamas, Professor of the Humanities and of Comparative Literature and Philosophy at Princeton University, and New York Public Radio host Leonard Lopate, to discuss his co-curated exhibit A World...
“What is space and time really? Why is the universe really big?” Professor Nima Arkani-Hamed asks. “And on top of that, we don’t understand why there are big things in it.” Part of a family that zigzagged the globe in pursuit, and defense,...
Peter Brown of the New York Review of Books reviews The Crucible of Islam by Glen Bowersock , Professor Emeritus in the School of Historical Studies. Of the book, Brown writes, "We look into the depths of the crucible itself,...