Arnold J. Levine

Arnold J. Levine, Professor Emeritus in the School of Natural Sciences, was among the first researchers to independently isolate the p53 protein in 1979. A recognized leader in cancer research and mentor to countless young scholars, Levine’s distinguished career has spanned various branches of the...
Cancers most commonly arise because of a series of two to five mutations in different genes that combine to cause a tumor. Evidence from a growing number of experiments focused on truncal mutations—the first mutations in a given sequence—suggests a new direction in understanding the...
Myles W. Jackson , newly appointed Professor in the School of Historical Studies will give his first IAS public lecture, "Genes, Patents, and Race: The History of Science as a Bridge Between Disciplines" on Friday, October 26 at 5:30 p.m. in Wolfensohn...
Institute for Advanced Study scholars and collaborators have created the first mathematical model to predict how a cancer patient will respond to immunotherapy , according to a study published in Nature .
In the last 65 years of biology, we have witnessed three changes in the dominant paradigm employed to make progress in the life sciences; the systems biology of organisms (300 BC to 1950 AD), molecular biology and genetics employing a reductionist approach (1950 to 2000),...