2004-2005 Concert Season

In 2003-2004, the Institute for Advanced Study's Artist-in-Residence Program launched Recent Pasts 20/21, a four-year initiative of chamber music concerts and lectures.  Hosted by Institute Artist-in-Residence, composer Jon Magnussen, the series is designed to explore the wide variety of aesthetic perspectives in western art music of the 20th and early 21st centuries.

October 15-16, 2004        

PIANOMORPHOSIS
BRUCE BRUBAKER, piano
PHILIP GLASS, composer 
 

December 2-4, 2004        

A PRINCETON CONNECTION
JUDITH BETTINA, soprano
and JAMES GOLDSWORTHY, piano
BLAIR MCMILLEN, piano
PAUL LANSKY, composer
MILTON BABBITT and ANDREW IMBRIE, composers
 

February 25-26, 2005      

MUSIC OF THE SOUTH CAUCASUS
CONTINUUM®, ensemble
JOEL SACHS, conductor/scholar
 

PIANOMORPHOSIS
BRUCE BRUBAKER, piano
October 15 & 16, 2004 at 8:00 p.m. in Wolfensohn Hall

Concert Talk: October 16, 2004 at 6:45 p.m. in Wolfensohn Hall

Pianomorphosis challenges and explores the boundary between hearing and seeing.  Created by Bruce Brubaker and designer Ben Kato, the event brings together minimalist piano music of John Adams, John Cage, Alvin Curran, and Philip Glass; literary texts by authors including T.S. Eliot, Wallace Stevens, and Virginia Woolf; theatrical lighting and movement.  Dedicated to extending the repertory and the way music is presented, while keeping alive the deeply expressive potential of the piano, Bruce Brubaker has performed in concerts from Lincoln Center's Avery Fisher Hall to Leipzig's Gewandhaus, from the Hollywood Bowl to the Wigmore Hall.

 

RECENT PASTS 20/21 CONVERSATION
Hearing and Seeing: Philip Glass speaks with
Bruce Brubaker and Jon Magnussen
October 15, 2004 at 4:00 p.m. in Wolfensohn Hall
Composer Philip Glass' repertoire ranges from opera, dance, theater, orchestra and film.  Lauded for Einstein on the Beach and Music in Twelve Parts, Glass is also renown for the scores for Godfrey Reggio's Koyaanisqatsi and the Academy Award nominated films The Hours, directed by Stephen Daldry and Kundun, directed by Martin Scorsese.  Premieres in 2003 include the opera The Sound of a Voice with libretto by David Henry Hwang, the score to Errol Morris' new film The Fog of War, and the CD release of Etudes for Piano Vol. I, No. 1-10 on the Orange Mountain Music label.  Glass recently premiered Orion, a new work for ensemble and world musicians commissioned by the Cultural Olympiad 2001-2004 at the Acropolis in Athens, Greece. 

A PRINCETON CONNECTION
A Princeton Connection celebrates the richness and diversity in the work of composers associated with this town by attempting the impossible: to present a representative spectrum of Princeton-associated music spanning three-quarters of a century.  Including music from Roger Sessions (On the Beach at Fontana), through the 1960s heyday of the Columbia-Princeton Music Center, and further, to today’s younger generation of composers – and world premieres by Su Lian Tan, David Rakowski, and the late Edward T. Cone.

 

MUSIC FOR VOICE
JUDITH BETTINA, soprano
JAMES GOLDSWORTHY, piano
December 3, 2004 at 8:00 p.m.
in Wolfensohn Hall
 
Hailed for her proficiency in a wide range of musical styles and acclaimed for her performances of contemporary music, Princeton’s own Judith Bettina has had works composed for her by many Princeton-associated composers.  Bettina is joined by her partner Goldsworthy, Director of the New Works for Young Pianists Commissioning Project and a member of the faculty at Westminster Choir College of Rider University.

Works on the program: Milton Babbitt (Now Evening, After Evening, Pantun, and both versions of Phonemena); Edward T. Cone (Three Songs from Pippa Passes – world premiere); Mario Davidovsky (Lost); Tobias Picker (not even the rain, Half a Year Together, Native Trees and To the Insects); Mel Powell (Levertov Breviary); David Rakowski (Sara, Georgic, Cassandra, To Be Sung On the Water, and Scatter); and Roger Sessions (On the Beach at Fontana).

MUSIC FOR PIANO
BLAIR MCMILLEN, piano
December 4, 2004 at 8:00 p.m. in Wolfensohn Hall
Concert Talk: 6:30 p.m. in Wolfensohn Hall

Photo by Keiko Nagata
Acclaimed as a “prodigiously accomplished and exciting new artist,” (Tommasini, New York Times), Blair McMillen is one of the most versatile and sought-after young pianists today.

Works on the program: Mario Davidovsky (Synchronisms No. 6); Emily Doolittle (Minute Etudes, from Books I and II)); John Harbison (Gatsby Etudes); Andrew Imbrie (Daedalus); Jon Magnussen (Toccare!); Frederic Rzewski (Dust – North American premiere); Su Lian Tan (Invocation from Orfeo in Asia – world premiere); and Barbara White (selections from Reliquary).

Immediately preceding the concert, Institute Artist-in-Residence Jon Magnussen and composers Su Lian Tan and Barbara White will join Blair McMillen for a discussion about the works on the program. 
 

FOCUS: PAUL LANSKY, composer
"The Contexts of Musical Technology"
December 2, 2004 at 4:00 p.m. in Wolfensohn Hall

Photo by Kui Dong
When machines make music, how do we understand it, how is it used, what is it for? Composer, educator, and software designer, Paul Lansky presents some of his most recent works, including a screening of a cartoon by Grady Klein for which Lansky wrote the music (about a dust bunny and a robot vacuum cleaner – technology run amock); and shares his thoughts about the place for his work and what he is trying to accomplish.
 
PERSPECTIVES: Milton Babbitt and 
Andrew Imbrie, composers
December 3, 2004 at 4:00 p.m.
in West Building Lecture Hall

Photo by
 Bayard Carlin
Princeton composers Milton Babbitt and Andrew Imbrie both studied with Roger Sessions early in their careers, and have since influenced a wide range of contemporary musicians, in many different areas, over an extended period of time. They continue to make important contributions to the musical world – one from the east coast and the other from the west.

MUSIC OF THE SOUTH CAUCASUS
CONTINUUM® 
Cheryl Seltzer and Joel Sachs, Co-Directors

February 25 & 26, 2005 at 8:00 p.m. in Wolfensohn Hall
Concert Talk: February 26, 2005 at 6:30 p.m. in Wolfensohn Hall

Photo by Nan Melville
The extraordinarily colorful composers of *Armenia, **Georgia, and ***Azerbaijan. The program includes: *Alexander ASLAMAZOV: Napyev (Melody), for clarinet solo; **Sulkhan NASIDZE: Four Improvisations, for violin and piano; ***Oleg FELZER: Vestige, for violin, clarinet and piano; ***Franghiz ALI-ZADEH: "Apsheron" Quintet, for piano and string quartet; ***Faradzh KARAYEV: Postludia II, for piano, double bass, and string quartet (U.S. Premiere); *Suren ZAKARIAN: In Statu nascendi – Seven Miniatures for String Quartet (U.S. Premiere); and **Giya KANCHELI: Psalm 23, for soprano, alto flute, viola, cello, double bass, synthesizer, and tape.  
RECENT PASTS 20/21 LECTURE
"The Musical World of the South Caucasus"
JOEL SACHS, conductor/scholar
February 25, 2005 at 4:00 p.m.
in the West Building Lecture Hall

Photo by Hiroyuki Ito
Co-director of CONTINUUM® and founder and conductor of the New Juilliard Ensemble, a chamber orchestra for new music, Joel Sachs is one of the most active individuals on the New York contemporary music scene. His wide-ranging interests in the world of music has led to performances and residencies in regions including Central and South America, the Near East, Azerbaijan, Mongolia, and Uzbekistan.